The NEC All-Decade Team – A Compilation of Greatness

While perusing my timeline on The Athletic over Thanksgiving break, I noticed many articles were dedicated toward examining the all-decade teams for teams spanning a multitude of sports. They ranged from the New York Yankees to the Michigan Wolverines to the Minnesota Wild, so I figured, why not here?!

There’s been a wealth of talent in the Northeast Conference over the past decade. To condense the greatness to a list of 10 all-timers would be challenging, which is why a 9-person panel was summoned to vote and provide their expertise. The panel contained a mix of fans/bloggers like myself, coaches who’ve been either NEC assistants or head coaches for the entire decade, NEC announcers and of course hoops guru and resident historian Ron Ratner. Here’s the full panel:

  • Glenn Braica, Head Coach of St. Francis Brooklyn
  • Nelson Castillo, Founder of Blackbirds Hoops Journal Blog
  • Joe DeSantis, NEC TV Analyst
  • Rob Krimmel, Head Coach of Saint Francis University
  • Anthony Latina, Head Coach of Sacred Heart University
  • Matt Mauro, Founder of The Blue Devils Den Blog
  • Ryan Peters, NEC Sports and Blue Ribbon College Basketball Yearbook Contributor
  • Dave Popkin, NEC Play-by-Play Announcer
  • Ron Ratner, Senior Associate Commissioner of the Northeast Conference

The panel was given a list of 25 players to choose from and asked to vote their team “1” through “10.” To qualify for this list, each player had to compete for at least two seasons in the NEC this decade.

Without further ado, allow me to introduce to you the NEC All-Decade Team, highlighted by the NEC Player of the Decade!

 

NEC Player of the Decade
Jamal Olasewere, F, LIU Brooklyn

A staple of the Blackbirds dynasty from 2010-2013, Jamal Olasewere redefined the power forward position with an impossibly quick first step and ability to slash and attack the rim with reckless abandon. His opponents may have known what was coming, and yet they couldn’t contain the athletic and fiercely competitive wing, as evident from Olasewere’s 860 career free-throw attempts. His final three seasons in Brooklyn stack up as one the great stretches of any NEC player, checking off every box a student-athlete could hope for. He was a multi-year league champion, won the 2013 NEC POY award after a dominant senior season (18.9 ppg, 8.6 rpg, 51.5% FG) and finished as LIU’s all-time leading scorer with 1,871 points. He was literally unguardable.

NEC All-Decade Team

Karvel Anderson, G, Robert Morris

As the only junior college transfer of this team, Karvel Anderson was ultra-productive for Andy Toole, registering 1,123 points, 206 rebounds and 201 made 3-pointers in two highly successful Colonial seasons. The 2014 NEC Player of the Year helped guide Robert Morris to back-to-back regular season championships with a splendid 31-8 mark against NEC competition, not to mention a victory over St. John’s with a 38-point performance in the first round of the 2014 NIT. He may be remembered most as a deadly assassin from downtown (career 45.4% 3PT), yet Anderson was also adept at attacking defenders off the bounce and making the most of his opportunities inside the arc (career 55.4% 2PT). He was a complete player who could fill it up from all three levels.

 


Julian Boyd, PF, LIU Brooklyn

There’s no question that Julian Boyd, the 2009 NEC Rookie of the Year, personified grit and guile in his return from a heart ailment that forced him to miss the 2009-10 campaign. His return from that red-shirt season resulted in one of the most decorated careers the league has seen, culminating with two LIU championships and a NEC POY honor in 2012. Boyd may have been undersized as a big, yet he possessed the surest hands around the rim and grew his burgeoning game to the point where his offense from behind the arc (42.0% 3PT as a junior) served as a nice complement to his unstoppable interior game (career 55.5% 2PT). Boyd and Jason Brickman on the pick-and-roll were indefensible, resulting in the duo providing Blackbird fans much joy over the early part of the decade.

 


Keith Braxton, F, Saint Francis University

When you have a legitimate opportunity to become the first NEC player in history to record 2,000 points, 1,000 rebounds… AND compile 400 assists and 200 steals, then you deserve a coveted spot on the NEC All-Decade team even if your collegiate career isn’t over. Keith Braxton’s ability to instill his versatility, smarts and toughness is one of a kind – he doesn’t need to take over a game before providing a monster impact statistically. Furthermore, Braxton possesses an elite rebounding skill as one of only eight individuals to finish in the NCAA Division I top 30 in rebounding over the past two seasons, and this despite his “smallish” 6-foot-5 frame as a power forward. He’s a pivotal reason why Saint Francis has emerged as a routine title contender, so much so that Braxton feels like the Tom Brady to Rob Krimmel’s Bill Belichick.

 


Jason Brickman, PG, LIU Brooklyn

As the greatest pure point guard ever to play in the NEC, Brickman finished his illustrious career with the fourth most assists in NCAA Division I history with 1,009 helpers. The 3-time champion used his elite passing eye, pristine handle and efficiency from behind the arc (career 41.3% 3PT) and at the charity stripe (career 83.4% FT) to serve as the engine of the greatest offensive dynasty the league had ever seen. It’s a major reason why Jim Ferry and Jack Perri entrusted Brickman to play 89% of LIU’s available minutes over his final three seasons. There was no one who could see the court and create passing lanes out of nothing quite like Brickman.

 

 


Jalen Cannon, PF, St. Francis Brooklyn

Jalen Cannon is the epitome of someone who worked exceptionally hard at his craft, to the point where he made a linear progression throughout his four-year tenure in Brooklyn. From standout rookie, to double double machine to complete player, the undersized big steadily improved each season until he reached the pinnacle by guiding St. Francis Brooklyn to their first regular season championship in 16 years and deservedly winning the league’s 2015 POY award. The analytical metrics say Cannon is one of the best players the NEC has ever seen, and with good reason. The Allentown, PA native finished with the most rebounds in league history (1,159) and became only the second NEC player ever to log at least 1,500 career points and 1,000 career rebounds.

 


Shane Gibson, G, Sacred Heart

Shane Gibson is one of two players here that wasn’t selected as the NEC Player of the Year, even though he’ll go down as one of the most efficient volume scorers in league history. Over his final two seasons as a Pioneer, Gibson hoisted up 410 3-point attempts and impressively converted 42.4% of those, despite being the focal point of everyone’s scouting report. His 2011-12 junior campaign produced one of the greatest seasons from a NEC guard when he averaged 22.0 ppg, 4.7 rpg and 1.7 spg while producing the 54th best effective field goal percentage (59.8%) in Division I. He finished his career fifth overall in NEC history in points (2,079), free throw percentage (85.3%) and 3-pointers made (286). Quite simply, the man got buckets.

 


Ken Horton, F, Central Connecticut State

Based strictly on statistics, you’d be hard pressed to find anyone that had a bigger impact in the league than Ken Horton, Central Connecticut State’s all-time leading scorer with 1,966 points. Once a lanky, under-recruited kid from Ossining, NY, Horton developed into a practically unguardable upperclassman, averaging 19.3 points, 8.9 rebounds, 1.7 steals and 1.5 blocks per game over his final 59 contests. But aside from the numbers, Horton’s blend of size, athleticism and body control as a power forward trapped in a wing’s body led to an extraordinary junior season that rightfully ended with the 2011 NEC POY award. He was as versatile as they come.

 

 


Velton Jones, G, Robert Morris

If there’s a poster child of this all-decade team that encompassed heart, consistency and a ruthless tenacity on the court, Velton Jones was it. As a two-time All-NEC first team selection, the 6-foot-0 bulldog was a mainstay of a Robert Morris program that won 91 games in Jones’ four active seasons. Despite the Colonials deep basketball history, Jones left Moon Township with the fifth most points (1,588), second most assists (551) and the most made free-throws (495) in program history. More importantly, he was the heart and sole of a team that nearly shocked Villanova in the first round of the 2010 NCAA tournament and upset Kentucky in the first round of the 2013 NIT, registering eight points and five assists in the latter.

 


Junior Robinson, G, Mount St. Mary’s

Junior Robinson may have been, at times, the smallest player in Division I basketball at 5-foot-5, yet his mesmerizing blend of athleticism, playmaking skill and moxie was an absolute pleasure to witness. A sensational senior season worthy of the 2018 NEC POY award – he averaged 22.0 ppg, 4.8 apg and posted a 1.7 assist-to-turnover ratio – was the cherry on top of a selfless career under Jamion Christian. As an underclassman, Robinson did whatever he was asked to do by Christian, which some of the time meant deferring to others for the betterment of the team. Through it all, the ultimate team guy was a star in Mount St. Mary’s 2017 NCAA tournament victory over New Orleans (23 points, 3 assists, 9 of 14 shooting) and finished with the third most points (1,872), sixth most assists (457) and fifth most made 3s (230) in program history.

 

 

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Ryan Peters

I like NEC hoops. That's why I'm here.

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